Whole30 Garlic Aioli

Whole30 Garlic Aioli

We recently wrote about making homemade, Whole30-approved mayonnaise.  It was a post in which I lamented the sorrows that come with Whole30 depriving me of my beloved condiments due to their, generally speaking, repugnant ingredients. As a solution to this problem, homemade Whole30-approved mayo was a perfect fit.

Homemade mayo will take you by surprise.  It is far more delicious that its store-bought cousin and you can use it as a dip without feeling like you should be hiding while doing so.  But mayonnaise as your only condiment can only be joyful for just so long.  Before long, something that once knocked your socks off becomes over-done.  “Variety is the spice of life,” they say, right?  So, we decided to start playing with our mayo…

Whole30 Garlic Aioli

“But mayonnaise and aioli are not the same,” you are surely thinking.  And you are most definitely correct.  Generally speaking, mayonnaise is an emulsion of a neutral-flavored oil (commonly canola or soybean) with egg yolk, acid of some kind (usually vinegar or lemon juice) and sometimes mustard (powdered or prepared).  Aioli, on the other hand, is traditionally started by turning garlic into a paste in a mortar and pestle and then adding egg yolk, lemon juice, Dijon mustard, and olive oil.

If we are being absolute sticklers for tradition, this recipe is not a true aioli… but it is darn close.  Since our homemade mayo used extra light olive oil instead of canola, all that was needed to turn this mayo into a garlic “aioli” was to add garlic paste and adjust the flavor with some fruity extra-virgin olive oil (and a dash more acid to balance the additional fat).

Another break from tradition was my addition of some fresh herbs, specifically chives and flat-leaf parsley.  I’m a sucker for fresh herbs and since I was actually making this aioli to be a dipping sauce for a dinner party, I felt the herbs also helped with its visual appeal (some folks just don’t appreciate emulsified fats like I do…).

So…

LET’S GET STARTED

Start by taking some freshly-minced garlic, finely chopped chives, and flat-leaf parsley and combining them on a cutting board with a pinch of kosher salt (the coarse grit of the salt help turn the ingredients into a paste).

Whole30 Garlic Aioli

With one hand holding the handle of your chef’s knife, turn it on its side and place the heel of your other palm on the flat of the blade.  Holding your knife in this position, using the flat side of the tip of the knife, start to crush and smear the ingredients into the cutting board in a side-to-side, back and forth motion.

Whole30 Garlic Aioli

Continue this motion until the ingredients have taken on a paste-like consistency.  Use the blade of your knife to scrape it off the cutting board and collect it into a pile.

Whole30 Garlic Aioli

In a large mixing bowl, add one cup of your homemade mayonnaise and half of your garlic/herb paste (fresh garlic is rather pungent, it is wise to start off conservative and then add more later if needed).  Whisk to combine.  Add ½ a teaspoon of fresh lemon juice and mix to combine.  While vigorously whisking, slowly drizzle in ¼ cup of extra-virgin olive oil.  Taste and adjust seasoning with kosher salt and freshly-cracked white pepper.

Whole30 Garlic Aioli

 

Whole30 Garlic Aioli
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Comdiment
Serves: 1¼ cups
Ingredients
  • 1 cup, homemade mayonnaise
  • 1 large or two small garlic cloves, crushed
  • a pinch of chopped chives
  • a pinch of chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • ½ teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • kosher salt
  • freshly-cracked white pepper
Instructions
  1. Process:
  2. Take garlic, finely chopped chives, and flat-leaf parsley and combine them on a cutting board with a pinch of kosher salt (the coarse grit of the salt help turn the ingredients into a paste). Using the flat side of the tip of the knife, start to crush and smear the ingredients into the cutting board in a side-to-side, back and forth motion. Continue this motion until the ingredients have taken on a paste-like consistency.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, add one cup of your homemade mayonnaise and half of your garlic/herb paste (fresh garlic is rather pungent, it is wise to start off conservative and then add more later if needed). Whisk to combine.
  4. Add ½ a teaspoon of fresh lemon juice and mix to combine.
  5. While vigorously whisking, slowly drizzle in ¼ cup of extra-virgin olive oil. Taste and adjust seasoning with kosher salt and freshly-cracked white pepper.

This aioli is one that you will find yourself dreaming about and trying to find food to dip in it. I can not count the numerous amounts of times we have had sweet potato fries just so we can enjoy this yummy condiment. So, enjoy and start dipping!

Whole30 Garlic Aioli

Whole30 Mayonnaise

Whole30 Mayonnaise

If you’re a condiment-aholic like me, Whole30 eating can often make you feel like something is conspicuously missing from your eating life. Once you start reading the labels of the condiments you so often reach for, sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, and other corn and soy products seem almost impossible to avoid – let alone a host of other synthesized ingredients.

Last August, during our first round of Whole30, we came across many of these unfortunate discoveries; some expected, some less so. We knew our favorite brand of ketchup would not be allowed, due to it unfortunately containing high-fructose corn syrup. But we were rather surprised to find that the number one ingredient in that big tub of taco seasoning sitting in our pantry was corn meal! Why on earth would you put corn meal in taco seasoning? You are probably assembling your tacos into a corn taco shell and perhaps topping them with a corn salsa. Isn’t that more than enough corn?

More recently, I was at the grocery store shopping for a jar of plain mixed nuts. Nothing weird, just roasted and salted mixed nuts. I figured this would be easy. I reached for a package that had one of those earthy-crunchy, this-MUST-be-good-for-me-names like “simply good,” or something like that, figuring it would be just those basic ingredients for which I was looking. Nope. They felt it was necessary to season plain nuts with sugar.

I shared this shopping experience with a family member, in a conversation about Whole30, and they pointed out what should have been obvious: corn, sugar, soy… these are all subsidized crops. If broccoli was a subsidized crop, scientists would have been paid to find ways to work broccoli syrup into my ketchup or broccoli meal into my taco seasoning. A pretty messed up way to decide what ingredients make it into your product, for sure.

But I digress…

So, you’ve taken to snaking on raw veggies instead of chips and M&M’s (congratulations!), but you can’t help feeling like you are eating rabbit food. All of this would be so bad if you could just dip them in some bleu cheese dressing or ranch dip, right? Nope, that will have to wait until next month. But all is not lost!

Enter: mayonnaise.

Ick! You may be thinking. That is probably because you have never made your own from scratch with quality ingredients. Believe me, it’s a different beast entirely. I was actually not prepared for just how delicious homemade mayo would be the first time that I made it. I wondered why I had waited so long to try it. Perhaps I was just a bit intimidated. You know, shouldn’t such emulsified emulsions  be left to the experts like Hellman’s, Duke’s and that quaint little French bistro you love so much? Na! It’s actually quite easy as long as you know what to do.

LET’S GET STARTED

When making emulsions, things can tend to move a bit quickly and really require your full attention. For this reason it is important to have all of your ingredients measured out an in one place along with all of the equipment you might need no farther away that an arm’s reach. This is best practice for any type of cooking and professional chefs call it mise en place, which means “put in place;” to have all of your equipment and ingredients prepped and ready to go before you start with the actual cooking action.

Whole30 Mayonnaise

Small ramekins like these are extremely handy in making sure you have all of your ingredients measured out and ready to go as you need them. Here I have one whole backyard-fresh egg plus one egg yolk, freshly-squeezed lemon juice, Dijon mustard, extra light olive* oil and my handy immersion blender.** (The one we use is no longer made, but click the link for something similar. This is one kitchen tool that is always being used and worth adding to your kitchen!) I managed to forget to include it this photo, but I also use apple cider vinegar in this recipe. I find that using both lemon juice and vinegar gives a pleasing balance between their two acidic styles.

*When choosing your olive oil, go with something that has the lightest color possible. The darker the color, the more flavor it has. For this purpose, you want something with a very light and unobtrusive flavor (this is why most commercial mayo’s use canola or soybean oil).

** You will see a number of techniques for making your own mayo on the internet. Some recommend a blender, some us an immersion blender, and some swear that whisking by hand is the only way. I employ a hybrid of these techniques. I start the emulsion with an immersion blender and then I transition it to a bowl and whisk it my hand. This seems to work well for me but it might not be right for you. Try different techniques and find out which one gives you the best results. My only word of caution about immersion and traditional blenders (especially high-powered ones) is to use their lower settings so as to minimize the heat that they generate. Too much heat and your mayo will break (more on this later).

Start by adding the eggs, half of the mustard (1.5 tsp), half of the lemon juice (1.5 tsp), and half of the vinegar (1.5 tsp) to a tall, narrow and cylindrical container (I find this old blue plastic cup to be just about right) and blend until thoroughly mixed.

Whole30 Mayonnaise

Begin adding the oil by creating a steady and very slow stream of it going right down the shaft of the immersion blender. This is very important. The slower and more carefully you add the oil, the better your emulsion will be.

Whole30 Mayonnaise

Don’t try to add all of the oil (2 cups) in one go. Slowly add some oil then blend for a bit, add some more, then blend again.Whole30 Mayonnaise

Once you have added half of the oil and you have a good, stable emulsion, add the remaining 1.5 tsp each of Dijon, lemon juice, and vinegar. Continue to blending, adding another ¼ cup of oil. Once you have about ¾ cup of oil to go, using a rubber spatula, transition the emulsion to a large mixing bowl. Check for seasoning and add kosher salt and freshly-cracked white pepper to taste.

Whole30 Mayonnaise

Continue to add oil, a little at a time and beat vigorously with a hand-held whisk until all 2 cups of oil have fully incorporated into the emulsion. Check for seasoning again and adjust as necessary. You’re done!

Whole30 Mayonnaise

 

Whole30 Mayonnaise
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Condiment
Serves: 3 cups
Ingredients
  • 2 cups of extra light olive oil
  • 1 whole egg
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard, divided in half
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice, divided in half
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar, Divided in half
  • kosher salt, to taste
  • freshly-cracked white pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Start by adding the eggs, half of the mustard (1.5 tsp), half of the lemon juice (1.5 tsp), and half of the vinegar (1.5 tsp) to a tall, narrow and cylindrical container and blend until thoroughly mixed.
  2. Begin adding the oil by creating a steady and very slow stream of it going right down the shaft of the immersion blender. (The slower and more carefully you add the oil, the better your emulsion will be.) Don’t try to add all of the oil (2 cups) in one go. Slowly add some oil then blend for a bit, add some more, then blend again.
  3. Once you have added half of the oil and you have a good, stable emulsion, add the remaining 1.5 tsp each of Dijon, lemon juice, and vinegar. Continue to blending, adding another ¼ cup of oil.
  4. Once you have about ¾ cup of oil to go, using a rubber spatula, transition the emulsion to a large mixing bowl. Check for seasoning and add kosher salt and freshly-cracked white pepper to taste.
  5. Continue to add oil, a little at a time and beat vigorously with a hand-held whisk until all 2 cups of oil have fully incorporated into the emulsion. Check for seasoning again and adjust as necessary.

We have made this mayo two times in the past week and used it in many of the meals that we ate and mentioned in our Whole30 Week 1 Recap. This Whole30 Mayonnaise is a great starting point for many condiments and sauces that you will want to make. Trust me when I say it is worth making and last night during dinner were discussing if we will ever go back to the store bought stuff. Have you taken the plunge and made your own mayo? Any secrets you want to share? We will be sharing the aioli that we made later this week with this mayo.

And before I go, I can’t help but say a quick HAPPY BIRTHDAY to my hubby!

Whole30 MayonnaiseToday is his day and this crazy picture pretty much sums up how crazy his day was. And while most people would take the day off from cooking and being in the kitchen, he wanted to make his own birthday dinner and even kept it Whole30 compliant! He cooked pan-seared duck breast with marinated grilled portobello mushrooms, steamed artichokes and roasted beets.

Whole30 MayonnaiseI realized as we sat down to eat that he really just was looking for another way to eat some of this yummy Whole30 Mayonnaise, but really, can you blame him! Happy Birthday, Chris! You keep life tasty and fun in the kitchen and out! May this year be full of good food, warm times with family and friends and the courage to take leaps as you go after your dreams!

Reasons We Love Our VitaMix #11,067: Homemade Applesauce

Homemade Applesauce

No one really needs a $500+ blender.  I thought about putting a “but” in that first sentence but after a quick gut-check I opted for a full stop.  Because it’s true.  “My blender’s output isn’t measured in horsepower,” is the epitome of a “first-world problem.”  A VitaMix is, however, a really, really nice-to-have.

Danielle and I decided before Mary Stewart was born that we would make all of our childrens’ baby food at home from fresh, organic ingredients.  This is really a lot easier and less time consuming than it sounds… especially with a VitaMix.  Having the right tools for the job always makes the work go more quickly and smoothly.  In this pursuit, having a VitaMix made our weekly baby food prep sessions not only quick and easy but fun, too.

Charlie, our second of two, is now eating table food so, for now, the baby food factory is closed.  One food, however, that we still make on a regular basis, even for the adults, is applesauce.  If you have never had homemade applesauce, you have never had applesauce!  It could not be any easier to make, it BLOWS AWAY the store-bought kind, and you feel good knowing everything that’s in it.

Now that autumn is here, apples are abundant, cheap (even organic ones), and more often than not, local.  Recently, a friend of ours brought us back a bushel of apples from a local orchard that she visited.  While our heads are spinning thinking of all the ways to use the apples, one thing we know for sure is that we want an ample supply of apple sauce….

Read More »

Reasons We Love Our VitaMix #10,429: Confectioner’s Sugar

Confectioner's Sugar

It’s the sort of thing that has happened to all of us.  In this particular case, Danielle and I were hosting a dinner party for about 16 people.  I cooked the main meal and a good friend of ours was kind enough to bring some of her delicious desserts; real banana pudding and chocolate pie, in this case.  All she asked of me, since she was going to be late in arriving to the party, was that I make some whipped cream for the chocolate pie.  “No trouble,” I thought, “my stand mixer will make short work of that.”  And with that, the whipped cream became an afterthought….

Read More »

Real Caramelized Onions

Caramelized Onions

What do you think of when you read the term “caramelized onions” on a menu?  If you’re like me, this can be a source of much disappointment.  I am a big fan of onions in all forms, but to me the term “caramelized onions” means something special; something much different than onions that have simply been briefly sautéed in a hot pan or on a griddle.  To me, real caramelized onions are a labor of love that results in something more akin to an onion jam and is perhaps one of the most delicious and versatile condiments ever created.

Read More »

Grilled Portobello Mushrooms

Grilled Portobello Mushrooms

This is a delicious recipe.  It is also a utilitarian recipe.  By utilitarian I mean, we love this preparation, so we typically make it in bulk and just happen to have a few portobello mushrooms laying around, marinating in the fridge, waiting for culinary creativity to happen.  We are continually surprised by how much they contribute to some of the most random and unusual combinations, as they’re called up from the reserves to active duty.  Think of this recipe as good on its own, but perhaps better used as a tool – a “ringer,” of sorts – used to tie flavors or ingredients together as a small part of a larger dish, like we did here and  here.

Read More »